The Kensington Society blog

Why we support the Newcombe House plans

In December, the RBKC planning committee is expected to take a decision about the new planning application for the Newcombe House project in Notting Hill Gate. In spite of its 18-storey tower and hundreds of objections from individuals who hate the idea of a large tower block in the area, Kensington Society and three of the four established residents' associations in the area have decided to support the project. Why?

Council support for our police campaign

In early September, the Kensington & Chelsea council joined Kensington Society’s campaign to halt the erosion of police services in the name of austerity. At the same time, the campaign has grown. It now has its own website and and more than 2,000 have so far signed the 38 Degrees petition.

Beloved Notting Hill trattoria threatened

Da Maria, the little Neapolitan "trattoria" next door to the Gate Cinema in Notting Hill Gate, which has been run by the same family since 1980, is under threat. The owner of the property has applied for a merger of the cinema and the restaurant, in order to make the cinema foyer a little larger.

Public conference about holiday short lets in RBKC

On Wednesday 13 September, the council’s short term holiday lettings working group will hold a public conference in the Small Hall at Kensington Town Hall about the recent avalanche of holiday short-lets in London, and the effects this has had on neighbourhoods, housing and the hotel industry in the borough. In RBKC alone, some 8,000 homes are currently being let to tourists and business visitors.

Second meeting about police station closure

The Metropolitan Police invites all residents to a second face-to-face discussion with representatives for the local police force and the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC), about the proposed closure of Notting Hill police station. The meeting will be held at St John's Notting Hill Church, Landsdowne Crescent, on Wednesday 6 September at 7pm.

The week that was: 31 July - 6 August

During the seventh week after the Grenfell Tower fire, Elaine Elkington was appointed interim chief executive of KCTMO, the Treasury’s high interests rates to councils came under the spotlight, the second cladding combination test made a further 111 high-rise residential buildings officially unsafe, and the organisers of the Notting Hill Carnival announced their plans for honouring the Grenfell victims.

Public meeting about police station closure

The Metropolitan Police is inviting all residents to a face-to-face discussion with the borough commander for Kensington and Chelsea, Chief Superintendent Ellie O’Connor, and Chief Inspector Chris Mahaffey, about the proposed closure of Notting Hill police station. The meeting will be held at St John's Notting Hill Church, Landsdowne Crescent, on Tuesday 15 August at 1pm.

The week that was: 24 July - 30 July

During the sixth week after the Grenfell Tower disaster, Sajid Javid created the Grenfell recovery taskforce, which will check the council’s handling of the Grenfell disaster on behalf of the government, and the Metropolitan Police announced that there are reasonable grounds to suspect the council and the KCTMO of corporate manslaughter. It was also revealed that work to shroud the tower in a gigantic protective wrap will begin in the middle of August.

Notting Hill police station to be closed and sold

Notting Hill police station is to be closed and sold, unless an ongoing consultation about proposed cost cutting solutions for the Met results in a different solution. If it happens, Kensington police station will be the only police station in Kensington and Chelsea. A doubling of ward dedicated officers and better online services are to make up for the loss.

The week that was: 17 July - 23 July

The fifth full week after the Grenfell Tower disaster was dominated by the first full council meeting since the fire, where the agenda was pushed aside and residents from North Kensington were given a platform to vent their anger and demand changes to the council’s way of dealing with them. The council agreed to all motions put forward by the opposition and the new council leader promised radical change.

Elizabeth Campbell’s speech

At the first council meeting after the Grenfell disaster, the newly elected council leader Elizabeth Campbell pledged that the council would fundamentally change its culture and work much closer with community groups from now on. She announced that the council had secured 99 homes for the survivors from Grenfell Tower, and that they are trying to buy a further 20 that are for sale in North Kensington. She also promised that the future of the Grenfell Tower site will be decided together with the community.
We have the full speech.

An even more unbalanced cabinet

On Wednesday evening, Elizabeth Campbell, the new council leader, announced her cabinet. It has three fewer members than the previous and it is, unfortunately, even more unbalanced in favour of Chelsea and the southernmost parts of Kensington.
Although 80% of the borough's population lives in Kensington, 70% of the cabinet members represent Chelsea wards, and there is only one cabinet member north of Old Brompton Road.