The Kensington Society blog

The unbalanced cabinet

The current RBKC cabinet is heavily unbalanced in favour of Chelsea. Although 80% of the population lives in Kensington, half of the 11 cabinet members represent its little kid sister Chelsea.
If the cabinet was to reflect the spread of both the population and the councillors, 9 of the cabinet members should come from Kensington wards.

The week that was: 3 July - 9 July

The third full week after the Grenfell Tower fire was dominated by two meetings between the survivors and the authorises, which clearly demonstrated the frustration and anger felt.
It was also revealed that the RBKC council more than any other in England place homeless families outside its own borough. More than 900 have been in temporary accommodation outside the borough for over a year.

Our message to the Tory councillors

On Monday 3 July, when the Conservative councillors were about to select the next council leader among themselves, the Kensington Society sent them an email, urging them to select someone who recognises the need for a genuine culture change in the council and can engage with all sections of the community. Later that evening they chose Chelsea councillor Elizabeth Campbell.

The week that was: 26 June - 2 July

The second full week after the Grenfell Tower fire saw the resignation of the KCTMO head, the leader of the council and the deputy leader. The week also saw the appointment of the judge who will lead the public inquiry, and it was revealed that the refurbishment plans originally specified fire-resistant zinc cladding, but this was replaced with a much cheaper aluminum cladding with plastic core.

Nick Ross' email

Kensington Society’s president, Nick Ross, has been campaigning for better fire safety for many years. On Thursday, 22 June, he wrote a poignant email to a journalist about some misconceptions about Kensington, and about the years of disinterest for better fire regulations displayed by national politicians from both the main parties.

The Grenfell Tower fire

We are all shocked by the horrific fire that engulfed Grenfell Tower in northern Kensington in the early hours of Wednesday 14 June. Shocked not just by the enormous death toll and human suffering, but just as much by the inability of both our council and the government to provide help during the first couple of days to all those who had been made homeless. While the fire services, the police and the ambulances were the heroes we expect them to be, the relief work was left to the local community groups.